Call for Contributions

In addition to the invited talks listed on the program schedule, we solicit whitepaper contributions (for lightning talk and poster/demo presentation), at all stages of research maturity, from anyone working in the field of upper-limb assistive and rehabilitative devices, at all stages of their careers. We hope to attract contributions from a wide range of engineering and neuroscience researchers and medical and clinical practitioners, so if you work in this space, don’t hesitate to submit directly or reach out with any questions.

Whitepapers (alongside attestations of planned conference travel to enable us to plan hybrid logistics) should be submitted via this form.

Deadlines

Contributions will be accepted on a rolling basis. To enable potential contributors to plan travel to and registration for the BioRob 2022 conference, we guarantee the following response times:

Submit by June 27, 2022 to guarantee a response by June 29, 2022 (to accommodate the early registration deadline of June 30, 2022). Submit by August 2, 2022 to guarantee a response by August 5, 2022 (to accommodate the early registration deadline of August 5, 2022).

Submit by July 28, 2022 to guarantee a response by August 4, 2022 (to accommodate the regular registration deadline of August 5, 2022). Submit by August 12, 2022 to guarantee a response by August 15, 2022 (to accommodate the regular registration deadline of August 15, 2022).

The final deadline for all contributions is 11:59pm, July 28, 2022 (anywhere in the world). The final deadline for all contributions is 11:59pm, August 15, 2022 (anywhere in the world).

FAQ

Who should submit?

Broadly, we solicit contributions from two types of researchers and practitioners in the upper-limb assistive device space: those developing tools and seeking problems on which to apply them, and those who have a sense of a clinical need and are seeking tools to address it. We welcome contributions from anyone working in this space, in academia, industry, or medicine, and at any stage in their career (undergraduate, graduate, postdoctoral, faculty, clinical practitioner, or prospective user).

The primary objective of this workshop is to connect those building tools to those who understand clinical upper-limb assistive device needs. Since these discussions are most effective early in the research process, we encourage submission of any-stage work (and ESPECIALLY early-stage work) addressing this objective.

Work that has already been published in other venues is explicitly welcome, as long as it addresses the goals of the workshop; submissions will not be indexed on IEEE Xplore. Contributors will, however, be given the option of archiving their work on the workshop website.

What is the appropriate submission format?

Because our primary objective is to facilitate discussion between tool-generating and user communities at all stages of research maturity, whitepaper submissions of any format and length are welcome.

While we do not require them, contributors should feel free to use the IEEE templates. We recommend, but again do not require, a length of approximately 2+n pages (2 pages of content + unlimited references).

If you expect to deviate substantially from these recommendations and are concerned, feel free to reach out to us. For those looking for more guidance, several example submission formats are available below.

What will be the presentation format?

Accepted contributors should anticipate a two-part presentation of their work, as outlined in the program schedule:

Exact details on presentation logistics, including in-person and remote presentation options, will be available soon.

Can I get more guidance on appropriate submission structure?

We do not require a specific whitepaper structure. For those looking for more guidance, however, here are two example outlines:

Outline 1: Proposing a tool (e.g., sensor, exoskeleton mechanism)

  1. Tool Definition
  2. Previous Development Work / Applications (if applicable)
  3. Possible Application Domains

Outline 2: Proposing a clinical problem/need (e.g., wearable sensing for at-home stroke rehabilitation)

  1. Problem/Need Definition
  2. Existing Solutions (if any)
  3. Possible Novel Solutions